Technical Chairperson

Use some common sense.

Someone is not going to give you $15 million U.S. to help them transfer money stuck in some far away country. See www.419eater.com for some sample letters.

 

You did NOT win a foreign lottery you never entered (www.scambusters.org/foreignlottery.html)
 
Microsoft is NOT going to give you money for forwarding an Email (http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/nothing/microsoft-aol.asp)
 
If something pops up while surfing the net (they also come in Emails, via Skype and other programs) indicating that your PC has detected problems and you should click to fix it. Guess what? It’s not true, and most likely your computer will become infected from doing so. In general these programs will find some problem with your machine either immediately or in the near future, and the only cure is to buy their program. If you do buy it, in the near future it may detect something else wrong for which there will be a different program you need to buy to fix it!
I personally know someone who went through 5 iterations of this, spent over $250 on useless software, and wound up with a computer that couldn’t even load solitaire.
Then this person called me for help.
Don't let this happen to you!
 
Bellow are some examples of fake alerts:
 
 
 
Understand where I’m going with this?
 
In general programs of this type are not free. In general nobody wants to give you a “free” pc health test, optimize your machine, etc. There is no such thing as “free” software.  You pay for it one way or another. Some examples you may not be aware of are: Donationware (Like The PC Decrapifier) depends on donations. Privacyware (i.e. any Google program) gives you an application or service in exchange for your privacy, and may actually OWN any content you create. Adware will show you ads in exchange for a program. Even some “open source” products want to be paid.

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